Hiking the Rio Grande

Start of the Hike
The trail near Tingley Beach where The Dog and I started our hike.

I woke up this morning looking forward to the block of time scheduled on my calendar from 7:00 AM to 9:00 AM. I know, who the heck looks forward to anything at seven in the morning on a Saturday? Most people are still asleep or just waking up to their first cup of coffee around that time on a Saturday morning. I, on the other hand, had made sure I had dedicated time to pack up the dog and a small backpack early enough to beat the crowds on the trails skirting the east side of the Rio Grande.

These excursions into the Bosque are my escape from the riggers of day-to-day life. Limited technology, only the faintest sound of traffic in the distance, and quiet head space to explore those thoughts normally suppressed by the rush of daily existence. It is a peaceful place to find yourself in on a Saturday morning. I don’t take this time nearly enough.

The Dog was less than impressed with the early start to the day. She doesn’t get out enough to understand events like this should be a regular aspect of her life. However, she sat quietly as I put her vest, collar, and nose-guide on in preparation for our excursion. Obediently, she hopped in the front passenger seat of the car and began to shake. It was chilly this morning, but her shaking was simply from being put in the car (an experience she still isn’t fond of).

We drove the one mile distance in just a few minutes. Passing downtown’s multi-story buildings, the outskirts of the zoo, and the older parts of the Barelas Neighborhood. It was quiet and almost no traffic. The perfect start to the day.

We unloaded at Tingley Beach and headed off into the wild. It sounds childish, but despite the number of times I have hiked these trails, I still feel like an explorer far from civilization discovering new places in the world. It’s a freeing feeling to think that so few people (statistically speaking) have walked the same trails I have walked. The Dog led the way with enthusiasm as she smelled the scents of a hundred dogs who came before her, trying to cover all of them as quickly as possible – suffice to say, she failed.

 

With a brisk breeze and a rising sun, we headed north along the well-worn trails between the Rio Grande and The Paseo Del Bosque Trail. The cottonwood trees swayed back and forth, the river flowed just beyond the trees, and we hiked our way through a corridor used throughout history. It was very calming, almost meditative, as we passed the river viewing area just south of Central Avenue.

The quiet and centering feeling continued through our turnaround point at Interstate 40. It was only after we took a break, about a quarter of a mile south of the Interstate, on our way back to where we parked the car that we started to see more foot traffic. For the most part, the other trail users were polite and courteous – making sure their dogs were properly handled, moving to the side to allow us both to pass each other, and taking care to not overly disturb the surrounding vegetation off trail. However, it is important to note that many of the dog owners do not keep their dogs on leashes unless they see someone else on the trail. This can cause a canine confrontation calamity if you’re not paying attention.

Throughout the return trip, The Dog and I got to listen to the river, a wily woodpecker trying to force its way through a Cottonwood, and (presumably) the mating calls of geese and ducks. It was all very grounding for me personally and helps me appreciate the world we live in just a little bit more than I do on a daily basis. This is an experience people of all ages can enjoy.

All in all, The Dog and I walked a little over 5 miles at a leisurely pace in about 2 hours. I highly recommend that everyone takes some time to disconnect from the modern world and return to the nearly raw nature of a hiking area – even if the trails are improved and you’re not breaking brush to get where you’re going. I know I will be making sure to regularly block out time on my calendar (and in my head) to hike the trails in and around Albuquerque.

Where do you like to hike? What benefits do you get out of a quiet walk through nature? Do you take your dog(s) with you or prefer the company of bipeds? Tell us all about it in the comment section – don’t forget to like, follow, and share this post on your favorite social media site!

Why I Deleted My Facebook Apps

Facebook Logo
Facebook logo obtained from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:F_icon.svg.

Facebook has been in the news recently for its complicit behavior towards Cambridge Analytica’s use of their API to data mine tens of millions of users. This sparked a #DeleteFacebook campaign (for which, I am sure Twitter was very grateful for) to protest the social media network’s handling of user data and its apparent unwillingness to regulate third-parties accessing that data.

With that brief synopsis out of the way, this most recent situation is not why I deleted my Facebook apps from my phone. Anyone who does not understand (through common sense, the terms and conditions, or privacy policies of social network companies) the data you put into these social media systems can be used for just about anything the company wants to use it for. These are content companies that do not create content because the masses are willing to do that all by themselves. Anything that goes into “the cloud” or on a social media site is free game for these companies. I accept all of these facts as necessary evils of the “online world” and do not have an issue with what I put online being used to profile me (after all, I put it there willingly).

However, I have been noticing a pattern of behavior over the past several months that I realized had been there since I got my first iPhone. I was spending an inordinate amount of time scrolling through my Facebook news feed and on Messenger. I wasn’t looking for anything in particular and my friends are not avid post makers; I was just scrolling through it to see if I had “missed” anything. Hours and hours spent staring at my iPhone 7 reading headlines and click-bate.

A few Saturdays ago, I realized I spent 4 straight hours staring at my news feed. I had tapped on a number of entertaining items, but I hadn’t internalized any of the information (makes sense since none of the information was worth remembering). My eyes hurt from staring at the small, high-definition screen. My body was achy from being in the same position on my couch for so long. The day was shot due to my apparent inability to get out of Facebook and off my phone.

There have been a number of studies conducted that show people spending hours on social media sites (primarily from their smart phone). We aren’t addicted to the technology (whether it be the code of the social media site or the phone itself), we are addicted to wanting to be “the cool kid” who sees the next viral meme first and shares their insight on the best meal in town or the next “hot” event.

I am 34 years old – I was never the cool kid and I haven’t had the desire to be the cool kid in over a decade. So why was I spending so much time scrolling through Facebook?

Passive entertainment. It takes zero effort to scroll through a news feed and very little conscious drive to tap a thumbs up button indicating you liked someone’s content. Unlike a hike or run, you get a pleasure from the content of your news feed on Facebook that is so easy to acquire you don’t want to do anything else.

People talk about cutting the cord when it comes to cable television providers (opting for online services like Netflix and Hulu), but so few people talk about the negative impact on kids and adults alike of needing to be on social media. These sites prey on a person’s desire to be entertained and informed. They are not inherently evil for doing this (it’s a business model created by my generation after all), but I doubt they would apologize for sedating my generation and the generations to come.

With all of this in mind, I have deleted Facebook, Messenger, and my Facebook Admin apps from my phone. I do this not as an official form of protest, but as a way of saving myself from wasting any more time staring at my phone. I will still utilize the services from my web browser on my laptop (for some reason it is less engaging in this format), but will no longer burn through 60% of my battery simply scrolling.

Since logging out and deleting the apps, I have found myself with hours to fill with much more productive activity such as gardening, reading, writing, and spending time with people in the real world. It has been amazing so far and I plan on keeping it this way.

How do you all feel about social media and its use of our freely provided content? Have you #DeletedFacebook form your devices? Did you close your accounts completely? Share in the comments below and don’t forget to visit this blog’s social media accounts to like and follow for additional content!